The Best RV Campgrounds for Fall

Oct 21, 2020 | Travel & Destinations

The Best RV Campgrounds for Fall

While the season change brings cooler weather, there’s still plenty to do outdoors across the U.S. with these fall RV trips.

By Ashley Rossi

Extend your camping season into fall with a stay at one of these exceptional campgrounds. Whether you’re roadschooling, working from your RV, or need a vacation, these campgrounds offer more in fall. Renowned state parks, RV resorts with all the bells and whistles, and festive fall events—there’s a fall camping trip for everyone. 


RV Camping in October

Between Halloween activities, leaf peeping, and mild weather, October is an ideal time for a fall camping trip. Here are our favorite RV campgrounds to visit in October. 

River’s End Campground & RV Park, Georgia

Travel trailer parked at campsite under trees
Photo courtesy of Visit Savannah

Why It’s Great in Fall: 

After the summer beachgoers head elsewhere, Tybee Island enters its “second season” of pleasant weather, fewer crowds, fresh seafood, and lower rates. River’s End is located minutes from the beach and other attractions, like Tybee Island Museum and the Tybee Island Lighthouse. Plus, it’s just 15 miles from Savannah, which is known for its haunted history and foodie scene.

Campground and RV Amenities: 

  • Shady sites
  • Full hookups with cable, water, sewer, and 30 or 50 amp electric
  • Free WiFi
  • Pet-friendly
  • Site sizes vary but can accommodate rigs up to 45 feet
  • Private bathhouses 
  • 24-hour laundry room
  • Fully equipped gym
  • Pool

Prices: 

Mid-season rates start at $47 per night for a primitive site, $62 per night for sites with water and electric, and $67 per night for full hookups. 

Dates: 

Open year-round.


Fort Ransom State Park Campground, North Dakota

River with boardwalk surrounded by fall foilage
Photo courtesy of North Dakota Tourism

Why It’s Great in Fall: 

Fort Ransom State Park is located in one of North Dakota’s peak fall foliage areas, along the Sheyenne Valley National Scenic Byway. There are plenty of outdoor activities to enjoy in the crisp fall weather. You’ll find two historic homesteader farms in the state park, the Andrew Sunne Farm and Bjone House. The oak-lined Sheyenne River offers canoeing and fishing opportunities, and the park is also home to hiking trails, including a segment of the North Country National Scenic Trail. 

Campground and RV Amenities: 

  • 30 or 50 amp electric and water hookups
  • Riverfront campsites 
  • Site sizes vary but can accommodate rigs over 35 feet
  • Pull-through sites
  • Dog park
  • Fishing pier
  • Dump station
  • Visitor center

Prices: 

Nightly rates range from $17 to $25.

Dates: 

Open year-round.


Zephyr Cove RV & Campground, Nevada

Campsite in the evening with people gathered at picnic table
Photo courtesy of Aramark

Why It’s Great in Fall: 

Fewer crowds and peak foliage, including Aspen golds, make this campground at South Lake Tahoe worth a visit in October. While it makes for a chilly dip, you can boat and fish on the lake still. The resort offers day boat tours and evening dinner cruises aboard the M.S. Dixie II paddle wheeler. On land, enjoy the property’s biking and hiking trails through the forest and along the sapphire blue lake.

Campground and RV Amenities: 

  • Full hookups with cable
  • Free WiFi
  • Can accommodate rigs up to 40 feet
  • Easy access to resort amenities and services

Prices: 

Average nightly rates for the fall season are $42.

Dates: 

Open year-round.


Ruby’s Inn RV Park, Utah

Aerial view of motorhomes parked at campground surrounded by trees
Photo: Colby Remund

Why It’s Great in Fall: 

Visit one of Utah’s most popular natural attractions, Bryce Canyon National Park, with fewer crowds in mid-to-late fall. Take a guided ATV tour or horseback ride through trails lined with changing fall leaves and the evergreen Ponderosa Pines. And don’t miss a stop to see the fall colors at Red Canyon, located 9 miles from Bryce, along Scenic Byway 12. At the campground, enjoy the adjacent resort’s amenities as well as a hot tub for opportune stargazing. 

Campground and RV Amenities: 

  • Electric, water, and/or full hookups available 
  • Big rig sites available that can fit any sized rig
  • Pull-through sites
  • Hot tub
  • Closest campground to Bryce Canyon National Park
  • WiFi access 
  • Dump station
  • Access to Ruby Inn’s amenities and services

Prices: 

Nightly rates start at $83 for electric and water only sites. 

Dates: 

The RV park and campground closes for the season on October 31.


Montana Basecamp, Montana

View of creek spilling out into a river lined with reeds and fall foliage in the background with mountains

Why It’s Great in Fall: 

Located in Kalispell, Montana, at the base of the famed Flathead Valley is the newly-opened Montana Basecamp. With panoramic views of the region’s foliage and access to both Glacier National Park and renowned state parks, this campground is an ideal spot to enjoy Montana’s wide-open spaces. Visit breweries and boutiques in downtown Kalispell via the Great Northern Bike Trail. You’ll find even more biking and hiking trails at Lone Pine State Park, Herron Park Foys’ to Blacktail, Pig Farm, and other nearby parks.

Campground and RV Amenities: 

  • Full hookups
  • Free WiFi and cell phone signal
  • Big rig friendly with paved pad and yard
  • Newly constructed facilities 

Prices: 

Nightly rates are between $60 and $65 for the month of October (depending on the site).

Dates: 

Closes for the season on October 31.


Niagara Shores Campground, New York

Gushing waterfall surrounded by tourists and recreational paths in fall
Photo courtesy of Niagara Falls USA

Why It’s Great in Fall: 

The Upstate New York region’s fall foliage peaks in late October, so there’s no better time to enjoy a waterfront campsite along the shores of Lake Ontario. Located in Appleton, New York, less than an hour from Niagara Falls State Park, Niagara Shores is a convenient base camp for exploring the popular attraction come fall. Appleton itself is home to a winery (rumored to be haunted) and the campground has kayaking and a meditation labyrinth. 

Campground and RV Amenities: 

  • 30 and 50 amp sites
  • Can accommodate rigs up to 60 feet 
  • Pet-friendly 
  • Waterfront sites
  • Mini-golf, rock wall climbing, and sports fields
  • Game room
  • Grocery store and souvenir shop

Prices: 

Nightly rates start at $59. 

Dates: 

The campground closes on November 1. 


RV Camping in November

While temperatures chill in the northern part of the U.S., November is the ideal time to visit southern, sunny beach resorts. But don’t discount state parks and destinations that are in their shoulder season. 

General Coffee State Park Campground, Georgia 

Children feeding farm animals in front of a log cabin
Photo courtesy of Georgia Department of Natural Resources

Why It’s Great in Fall: 

There are plenty of places to enjoy the mild weather, outdoor activities, and underrated fall foliage (check the foliage forecast before your trip) in Georgia’s state park system, but General Coffee State Park campground stands out for its variety of offerings. Kids will enjoy learning about the onsite Heritage Farm and feeding the park’s animals. Birdwatchers and photographers will love the cypress swamp, and horse lovers can ride on the park’s more than 13 miles of trails. 

Campground and RV Amenities: 

  • Electric and water hookups
  • Modern comfort stations
  • Site sizes vary but can accommodate rigs up to 50 feet
  • Dump station
  • Animal farm
  • Kayak, pedal boat, and canoe rentals
  • Gift shop

Prices:

The average nightly rates at Georgia’s state park campgrounds are between $30 and $35.  

Dates: 

Open year-round.


Jonathan Dickinson State Park Campgrounds, Florida

Person hiking along coastal waterway
Photo courtesy of Martin County Office of Tourism & Marketing

Why It’s Great in Fall: 

South Florida’s largest state park is home to two campgrounds—Pine Grove, located at the east entrance, and River, located near the Loxahatchee River—that are ideal for families and exploring the park’s 16 distinct environments. Coastal sandhills, upland lakes, scrub forests, and a river offer opportunities for both land and water activities like birding, boating, fishing, hiking, horseback riding, mountain biking, swimming, and more. The park also has a fascinating history as a 1930s pioneer homestead and secret WWII training camp. The park’s namesake, Jonathan Dickson, was a shipwrecked merchant. 

Campground and RV Amenities: 

  • Water and electric hookups
  • Sewer hookup and dump station (Pine Grove Campground only)
  • Site sizes vary but can accommodate rigs up to 75 feet
  • Modern facilities with laundry
  • Education and research center with family programming for campers
  • Boat tours
  • Food and beverage garden with locally sourced food 

Prices: 

The nightly rate is $26. 

Dates: 

Open year-round.


Wahweap RV and Campground, Arizona

Aerial view of RVs parked at campground during dusk with lake and canyons in the background
Photo courtesy of Aramark

Why It’s Great in Fall: 

Head to Lake Powell, located on the Arizona-Utah border, after the summer crowds are gone. Come for the stunning blue water—which is calmer in these months—and red sandstone cliffs, and stay for the lower fall prices. Wahweap RV and Campground is just a short walk from the lake, so grab a boat rental and head out on the water for the best fishing of the year. Located in the Glen Canyon National Recreation Area, you’re near more than 2,000 miles of backcountry and side canyons, horseback riding, and Glen Canyon Dam tours. 

The season is also an ideal time to visit nearby attractions like Rainbow Bridge National Monument, Antelope Canyon, and Horseshoe Bend, which are normally crowded other times of the year. 

Campground and RV Amenities:

  • Full hookups
  • Site sizes vary but some can accommodate rigs over 70 feet
  • Laundry and shower facilities 
  • General store
  • Swimming beach
  • Free WiFi

Prices: 

Nightly rates start at $68. 

Dates: 

Open year-round. 


Cape Charles / Chesapeake Bay KOA, Virginia

Parked RV at campground with awning out and patio setup with chairs, table, and fire pit
Photo courtesy of Cape Charles / Chesapeake Bay KOA

Why It’s Great in Fall: 

Celebrate the holiday season on Virginia’s Eastern Shore at the Cape Charles / Chesapeake Bay KOA. Located on the resort’s own private beach along the Chesapeake Bay, this popular summer destination has fewer crowds in the fall, so you can enjoy walks on empty beaches and explore the surrounding 1,700 acres of parkland. Fall brings festive events at the campground, like a holiday market, Thanksgiving feast, and monarch butterfly migration. 

Campground and RV Amenities: 

  • Full hookups, including cable
  • Waterfront sites
  • Site sizes vary but can accommodate rigs up to 45 feet
  • Dog beach
  • Camp store
  • Golf cart rentals
  • Free WiFi
  • Dog park

Prices: 

Nightly rates are between $36 and $95 for the months of October and November (depending on the site). 

Dates: 

Closes for the season on November 29.


Asheville East KOA Recreation, North Carolina

Aerial view of mid-sized town with fall foliage and mountains surrounding main street

Why It’s Great in Fall: 

Asheville and the surrounding Blue Ridge Mountains are home to some of the country’s best fall foliage and the Asheville East KOA is within a 15-minute drive of the historic downtown area. Drive along the Blue Ridge Parkway for leaf peeping and stop for the views or hike one of the many trails in the region. After your dose of nature, enjoy the local breweries and shopping in town, or tour the neighboring Biltmore Estate.   

Campground and RV Amenities: 

  • 50/30 amp and 30/20 amp sites
  • Water, electric, and cable hookups
  • Site sizes vary but can accommodate rigs up to 55 feet
  • Free WiFi
  • Fishing lakes and river 
  • Bike and boat rentals

Prices: 

Nightly rates are around $60 on average for the months of November (depending on the site).  

Dates: 

Open year-round.


Plan Your Fall Camping RV Trip

CampgroundsDestinationsFallGreat OutdoorsRoad TripsRV Camping

Ashley Rossi

Ashley is the managing editor at Togo RV. She comes from a background in travel writing which has taken her from Australia to Haida Gwaii. Her favorite national park is Zion and she's helping her parents plan an epic cross-country retirement trip in an Airstream.

Keep Up with the Pack

Sign up for emails from Togo RV